Sunday, March 26, 2017

WARNING: Eating This Very Common Food Can Give You Brain Worms - STOP EATING IT IMMEDIATELY!

Nowadays, people often eat raw or under cooked meat. Unfortunately, by doing this, they allow tapeworms to infect their bodies.

Tapeworms are gross and uncomfortable. They usually grows inside your stomach, waiting to devour each meal you consumes. 

Once these worms enter your body, they can move throughout your eyes, your tissues, and even in your brain. According to some researches, this can actually happen and can have life-threatening consequences.

One rare case of a Texan woman made medical experts in awe when she complained that she's suffering from severe headaches for many months, only to find out that her brains was already infected by tapeworms. 

Yadira Rostro first started to notice bad headaches nine months ago and finally sought medical help after they continued to get worse.

They immediately operated her to remove the parasites and took out a total of 8 tapeworm eggs from her brain.

Neurosurgeon Richard Meyrat believed that the 31-year-old picked up the tapeworms on a trip to Mexico two years ago, which are common in food contaminated with fecal matter.

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These parasites usually leave their eggs in the digestive tracts of their hosts and are excreted in feces in a few days. 

But somehow the worm sacs made their way through her bloodstream into in her brain, and feed on her blood supply.

With Yadira's permission, Methodist Dallas Medical Center shared video of doctors extracting the larvae earlier this month.

Neurosurgeon Richard Meyrat explained.

"They looked a little bit like eggs, and they have a clear sac," he said. "And inside it, a small tapeworm."

Yadira is expected to make a full recovery however, she doesn't want to view the footage from her surgery which is very understandable.

Humans can get infected by this tapeworm in 2 ways:

1. First Form Infections: Infection is caused by consuming undercooked pork from infected pigs, resulting in “taeniasis” or an adult worm residing in the intestine.
  • Signs and Symptoms: Pain, unexplained weight loss, blockage of the intestine and digestive problems.

2. Second Form Infections: Infection is in the larval form, through contact with the feces of an infected human or pig, which can go further on infecting many tissues. If the larval worm enters the nervous system or in the brain, it can result in a condition known as “neurocysticercosis”.
  • Signs and Symptoms: Nausea and vomiting, headache, lethargy, confusion, vision changes, weakness or numbness and seizure.